A Pleasant Afternoon in Peabody Park

Coreopsis Verticillata Photo by L. Chrump courtesy of Wikimedia
Coreopsis Verticillata Photo by L. Chrump courtesy of Wikimedia

Sunday, June 11 was a bit warm and humid. It is summer after all. But fifteen eager Auduboners took to the fields and woods in UNCG’s Peabody Park to see what nature had to offer. We were not disappointed. The newly-constructed wetland in the Park Fields had attracted a variety of dragonflies and damselflies. Black-eyed Susans and Coreopsis in the native plant prairie attracted several butterfly species—sulfurs and cabbage whites. At least a dozen bird species were seen or heard between the fields and woods, including Titmice, Catbirds, Towhees, Bluebirds, Song Sparrows, Blue Jays, Carolina Wrens, and Fish Crows.

Photo by Glenda Simmons courtesy of National Audubon Society
Eastern Bluebird; Photo by Glenda Simmons courtesy of National Audubon Society

The Park Woods offered welcome shade and a host of both native and  exotic plant species, most of which were expertly identified by Ann Walter-Fromson. Walkers also marveled at some of the Shortleaf  Pines that the University had sampled with a boring tool to determine their age. The oldest we saw that day was estimated to have germinated in 1837. We clambered over a couple of fallen trees to get a close look at the wetland in the woods. Around the edge of the small pool we discovered a number of freshly-dug tunnels that we guessed were the work of crayfish which may have migrated from the creek just a few yards away. The stream provided a good look at several small fish species; this is good news, because while crayfish were found there in the past, fin fish had been sadly absent. Nature is resilient.

All in all, a pleasant day on campus enjoying a variety of nature’s treasures just a mile from downtown Greensboro.